Faith, Honor, and Tradition

Samuel, a Hebrew Israelite, expressed a lesson in ancient times about faith. The first book of Samuel (KJV) says, “And Samuel said, Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams” (15:22). A possible interpretation of this is that a chosen people acknowledging the right purpose requires accepting that ritual is not the purpose, but rather the practice. This can be applied to those granted privileges from being selected for membership to a group based on academic merit, leadership potential, community service, and likelihood for future career success. With such criteria each being a basis for inclusion to a group, an honor society might be deduced. In contemporary times, when man works towards a goal, sometimes recognition is sought for career or personal advancements. In my experience, focusing on the stylishness and how fashionable an activity essentially has risks that provide opportunity for aesthetic beauty and refinement of a personal pathos. Further, a styled pathos with ethics and logic can show the merits of an activity. However, there are also threats from respecting the customized style of man or the traditions of man more than building traditions based on faith that is beyond the finite. Therefore, I think that honor is earned, but faith is gained through study. When considering the variety of faiths that people in the United States have as a pluralistic civilization, sometimes honoring how something feels like a good thing can help in building networks. Even so, building networks for future stability might require doing something even if there are perceptions that contradict those goals. The common saying “go with your gut” is similar in context and applications; relying on the physical world for actions comes with risks. The same may be said with having faith in the supernatural. That said, the supernatural proposing more than what man may consider, alone, is a structure for getting things done beyond an isolated part of history. Therefore, honor rather built in a teleological sense might extend the benefits of an ethic to morally significant events.

For example, consider doing business with a hotel manager, who for the purpose of this discussion, will be renamed Alice R. The reader may seek a hotel room for a future event, but there is an error in the process of booking it. When seeking a resolution to this, the reader could call and express a disregard for the feelings of Alice and the reputation of the hotel that she represents. However, there might be a notion of honor in the context of horizontal honor while the reader may work for another company or study with an alternative faith. However, in this situation, the request from the reader is treated with disrespect by Alice for possible reasons such as not studying the importance of respecting others, or perhaps forgetting about it. Therefore, Alice does a disservice to herself by caring more about vain works than building a relationship with a paying client that might extend to future business opportunities. As a result, the reader would be disrespected in the short term, but there are substitutes for businesses with activities that aggregate to trending company policies in Alice’s industry. Therefore, a substitute for tradition is right thinking. In exposition, business trends building up those who conserve what is respectable is probably more sustainable than how organizational leadership would progress. By focusing on political motivations at the cost of customer loyalty, company advancements are probably reduced.

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Author: Jonathan Kelly

For university education, Jonathan Kelly studies liberal arts and sciences. In his free time, he studies history and ethics in science fiction.

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