Reflections on Recursion

In the Spring 2017 term, approximately one week remains until completion. Throughout studies, this semester, I learned computer architecture, management information systems, and data structures & algorithms; and software engineering; and networks & telecommunications concepts. These courses being mandatory for my academic program are among the final courses for my Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. After this semester, one term remains until August graduation. In that term, my final courses in my undergraduate program shall be mobile & smart computing, discrete mathematics, network security, and linear algebra. All of the aforementioned statements may be considered as recursive (Goodrich, Tamassia, and Goldwasser, p. 190).

In some cases, undergraduate programs are limited by total years since the program started while other in periods of semesters attended, and alternatives are limited by total credits allowed for the program. In any of these cases, requirements for completion encourage initiative from students as well as faculty. The Apostle Paul shared insights about the incentives of studying by approaching various topics with a single framework. The Apostle Paul (KJV) said, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (2 Tim 3:16-17).  If selected courses start soon to a semester start or session, or books are purchased similarly, then the threat of missing deadlines increases from the early engagement opportunity inverting. The growing threats might be, as I noticed, due to variations in recognition of relevant collaborative for collective goals. This might be a sort of circular logic in that there is an absence of perceived importance for deadlines because there is more time remaining, there is more time remaining because of extensions permitted, and the extensions permitted result in less relevance for deadlines. In contrast, James Rachels’ (2012) explained that cultural relativists would invite acceptance of the following: “The Greeks believed it was wrong to eat the dead, whereas the Callatians believed it was right to eat the dead. Therefore, eating the dead is neither objectively right nor objectively wrong. It is merely a matter of opinion, which varies from culture to culture” (p. 749).

Considering the cultural relativist argument, the invitation from the ‘Greeks and Callatians’ syllogism is implicit casting about the dead and the living, claiming that there is life after death in the physical world. A possible interpretation of the cultural, generations of men, women, and children may learn about the merits and faults of arguments with the comfort that there is the proverbial more that is expected. The sort of invitation to an impasse by implicit casting is essentially saying that societies may be recognized for eventually and irreducibly immutable components. Kenta Oono and Yuichi Yoshida (2016) describing a property being proportional to an irreducible character is one kind of generalization of linearity testing. Therefore, looking at study schedules in terms of irreducible start times and finish times for an academic course or program as white box testing might trend towards an unfinished academic program. Examples of this may be recognized as an additional day for every assignment missed passed a deadline, another semester for every course not passed, or an academic program not completed.  However, actively engaging in coursework day-by-day strengthens awareness of information. In agreement with Aristolean virtue, consistent study and action builds character over time thus understanding emerges. Even in the case of an unfinished program, considering it in terms of time that is complete and reviewing fewer and fewer times until prepared for another program attempt could ready the student for a more purposeful or explicit attempt at the program. Therefore, sometimes, focusing on the details of a program can be more effective than a topical overview for evaluating measures for success.

References

Cahn, S. M., & Markie, P. J. (2012). Ethics: History, theory, and contemporary issues (5th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford university press.

Goodrich, Michael T.; Tamassia, Roberto; Goldwasser, Michael H.. Data Structures and Algorithms in Java, 6th Edition (Page 190). Wiley. Kindle Edition.

Oono, K., & Yoshida, Y. (2016). Testing properties of functions on finite groups. Random Structures & Algorithms, 49(3), 579-598. doi:10.1002/rsa.20639

 

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Author: Jonathan Kelly

For university education, Jonathan Kelly studies liberal arts and sciences. In his free time, he studies history and ethics in science fiction.

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