Computer Science Jobs in Brentwood/Franklin Tennessee Summer 2017

Since I began studying computer science in 2014, I decided that I would keep myself informed for computer science related jobs. I live in Brentwood, Tennessee, so I figured that there would be some jobs that I may compare and contrast. Some three years or so later, the only jobs available to me are data entry and customer service jobs. At this stage in my academic career, my skills used for data entry and customer service would be contrapositive to my academic program outcomes. For clarity, my academic program involved conceptualization of purpose, and design, development, and implementation of application software, system software, and information systems solutions. Even the tutoring jobs in the area, an often suggested job opportunity for students with explicitly capable academic ability, are disparate. Attributed to King Solomon of Israel, the Book of Ecclesiastes (KJV) says, “The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun” (1:9). Looking to a precept, a Psalm is, “And now Lord, what wait I for? my hope is in thee” (39:7). Therefore, approaching work in Brentwood, TN should be viewed with a historical context.

As I studied the job market for the past three years, my future plans for employment should involve trusting that statistical data related to jobs in the Brentwood area did not quantify areas of innovation that small and medium sized businesses would provide scientific and technology development. In this case, working towards starting my own business is a scenario in that I should invest because not doing so shall be a career limiter for realization of the maximization of my potential. The view that seeking an entrepreneurial path normatively consists of seeking a correct path for achieving career goals could be contrasted with job security. In particular, greater opportunity for career success reflects the threat of not getting a standard, or any, pay considerably encourages striving for multiple sources of income.

Reflections on Recursion

In the Spring 2017 term, approximately one week remains until completion. Throughout studies, this semester, I learned computer architecture, management information systems, and data structures & algorithms; and software engineering; and networks & telecommunications concepts. These courses being mandatory for my academic program are among the final courses for my Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. After this semester, one term remains until August graduation. In that term, my final courses in my undergraduate program shall be mobile & smart computing, discrete mathematics, network security, and linear algebra. All of the aforementioned statements may be considered as recursive (Goodrich, Tamassia, and Goldwasser, p. 190).

In some cases, undergraduate programs are limited by total years since the program started while other in periods of semesters attended, and alternatives are limited by total credits allowed for the program. In any of these cases, requirements for completion encourage initiative from students as well as faculty. The Apostle Paul shared insights about the incentives of studying by approaching various topics with a single framework. The Apostle Paul (KJV) said, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (2 Tim 3:16-17).  If selected courses start soon to a semester start or session, or books are purchased similarly, then the threat of missing deadlines increases from the early engagement opportunity inverting. The growing threats might be, as I noticed, due to variations in recognition of relevant collaborative for collective goals. This might be a sort of circular logic in that there is an absence of perceived importance for deadlines because there is more time remaining, there is more time remaining because of extensions permitted, and the extensions permitted result in less relevance for deadlines. In contrast, James Rachels’ (2012) explained that cultural relativists would invite acceptance of the following: “The Greeks believed it was wrong to eat the dead, whereas the Callatians believed it was right to eat the dead. Therefore, eating the dead is neither objectively right nor objectively wrong. It is merely a matter of opinion, which varies from culture to culture” (p. 749).

Considering the cultural relativist argument, the invitation from the ‘Greeks and Callatians’ syllogism is implicit casting about the dead and the living, claiming that there is life after death in the physical world. A possible interpretation of the cultural, generations of men, women, and children may learn about the merits and faults of arguments with the comfort that there is the proverbial more that is expected. The sort of invitation to an impasse by implicit casting is essentially saying that societies may be recognized for eventually and irreducibly immutable components. Kenta Oono and Yuichi Yoshida (2016) describing a property being proportional to an irreducible character is one kind of generalization of linearity testing. Therefore, looking at study schedules in terms of irreducible start times and finish times for an academic course or program as white box testing might trend towards an unfinished academic program. Examples of this may be recognized as an additional day for every assignment missed passed a deadline, another semester for every course not passed, or an academic program not completed.  However, actively engaging in coursework day-by-day strengthens awareness of information. In agreement with Aristolean virtue, consistent study and action builds character over time thus understanding emerges. Even in the case of an unfinished program, considering it in terms of time that is complete and reviewing fewer and fewer times until prepared for another program attempt could ready the student for a more purposeful or explicit attempt at the program. Therefore, sometimes, focusing on the details of a program can be more effective than a topical overview for evaluating measures for success.

References

Cahn, S. M., & Markie, P. J. (2012). Ethics: History, theory, and contemporary issues (5th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford university press.

Goodrich, Michael T.; Tamassia, Roberto; Goldwasser, Michael H.. Data Structures and Algorithms in Java, 6th Edition (Page 190). Wiley. Kindle Edition.

Oono, K., & Yoshida, Y. (2016). Testing properties of functions on finite groups. Random Structures & Algorithms, 49(3), 579-598. doi:10.1002/rsa.20639

 

Considering Business and Organizational Applications

As the latter half of the second week in the final Spring 2017 session transpires, studying the fundamentals of computer science and information systems enables future research opportunities. In my Networks & Telecommunication Concepts course, study topics expressed with descriptive brevity offers a challenge for interpretations because observations are expressed mathematically and empirically; essentially, a personal view can be accurate if and only if the observations are accurate. When learning a subject previously not understood from study, there is a requirement that trusting education material is acceptable. An introductory ethics course will probably offer information describing the aspects of the triple-sided argument: ethos, logos, and pathos. In the experience of this writer, mathematically scientific concepts require logic, yes, but in a world where every action is a choice, right bias thus a beneficial ethic is necessary. Further, emotional content being a part of life is a risk, but vision for improving from previous choices demands that the threat of emotional dysfunctionality be addressed for realizing opportunity.

With a particular relation to contemporary notions of emotional desensitization because of the exponential rate of information development is the threat of refracting on lessons learned rather than reflecting, so to speak; data received, but not processed with intentional vision threatens integrity in a way sort of similar to the Aristolean notion of recklessness as an extreme against the metric of virtue.  The Apostle Paul (KJV) said to the Colossians, “Beware lest any man spoil you through philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after Christ” (2:8). In exposition to organizational risk assessment, a normative design of a system built for social integrity would involve a derivation model of data conceptually applicable to integration onto economically beneficial unstructured decisions; that normalizing discernment for an organization is encouraged. Thus, Software Engineering as well as Data Structures & Algorithms being the two additional courses for the session that this writer is enrolled in might enable accurate understanding for business and organizational solutions.

Reflections on the First Spring 2017 Session

Within the previous eight weeks, two courses were completed: Computer Architecture and Introduction to Information Systems. Since my first session involved two courses, CSCI 210 and ISYS 204 that were three credit courses within the Regent University course offerings, the format was accelerated; as the previous and future courses fitting the description mentioned are identified as such, they require more percentages of weekly study time periods in shorter total course durations. ISYS 204 being an introductory course consisted of learning business and analytical knowledge about information systems, and Biblical ethics remain significant since this was a Regent University course, a Christian university. As sister to Oxford University, Regent University emphasizes the integration of the faith described and urged by the Bible with reason related to contemporary issues; ISYS 204 involving this demand on students was consistent with previous courses in my academic program.

In ISYS 204, there was an emphasis on the economics related to businesses using information systems as well; since contemporary economic theory in secular settings approves of utilitarianism, accepting this emphasis within course textbook titled Essentials of Management Information Systems by Laudon and Laudon (2017) as a challenge for the liberal arts encouraged confidence. The writing attributed by critical scholars to the Apostle Luke, the Book of Acts in the King James Bible expresses the basis that the Apostle Paul had for confidence. The Book of Acts (KJV) says about Paul, “And Paul dwelt two whole years in his own hired house, and received all that came in unto him. Preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching those things which concern the Lord Jesus Christ, with all confidence, no man forbidding him” (28:30-31). An interpretation of this passage is the recognition that any coming unto followers of Christ and not bringing the truth should be denied entry into our place of rest and encouragement for the rate of action that faith in the God of Israel provides (2 John 10:10). In exposition, the Laudon and Laudon (2017) text discusses the Golden Rule of the Biblical Scriptures; that a candidate ethical principle for business practices involves doing unto others as you would have them do unto you (p.127). Theologically speaking, although Laudon and Laudon are not literally in my home when studying the course text, the thoughts written to the text can be challenged; the form of written communication on the Internet Web provides a domain for capturing thoughts so that they are for Christ (2 Cor 10:5) rather than every wind of doctrine (Eph 4:14).

In my view as a Regent University student, the applications of the Biblical Scriptures mentioned was a learning outcome of CSCI 210 and ISYS 204, though not explicitly mentioned as such in them. My basis for the applications of the Bible for CSCI 210 and ISYS 204 is my experience with CSCI 220, Ethics for Computer Science: supporting the divine command theory was encouraged by my course instructor while rejected by the writers of the course texts called Ethics in a Computing Culture, Bo Brinkman and Alton F. Sanders (2013, p. 10). In contrast, the relevant Stallings (2016) text for CSCI 210, Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance, did not suggest or recommend any ethical arguments for computer architecture, so the Biblical integration related to that text was more relatable to transcendentals in mathematics than approval of utilitarianism by contemporary economists; conflicting interpretations of ethics were researched outside the CSCI 210 by Stallings for reasonable exposition. Having said that, there were much descriptions about computer architecture and low-level programming helped with programming skills; instructions on binary, hexadecimal, and assembly language programming emphasized allowed for studying applications related to computer architecture. Describable as essentially a game, one in particular, Core Wars, involved programs that combat a separate program for processing capability was useful for study; this was not played, so to speak, as the concept of play is about action without reason.

With two courses in the Spring 2017 term concluded, there are seven courses that remain in my academic program. Looking forward to my future challenges, my view remains that Regent University has much that may be offered to students, and online courses require commitment to significant periods of self-study that might build confidence in a power beyond the intelligence of mankind. Hopefully, my future academic studies will involve more Biblical integration for scientific and scientifically analytical theories and applications for continued research opportunities and the blessings of family and friendships.

References

Brinkman, B., & Sanders, A. F. (2013). Ethics in a Computing Culture. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Laudon, K. C., & Laudon, J. P. (2017). Essentials of Management Information Systems (12th ed.). Pearson Education.

Stallings, W., Zeno, P., & Jesshope, C. (2016). Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance (10th ed.). Hoboken, NJ.

 

 

Perceptions on Reflections

While reading a book by Clifford A. Pickover called The Physics Devotional, a quote reminded me of the importance of reflecting. Pickover wrote about something that Arnold Arons said about physics. Of Arons, Pickover (2015) wrote:

There is a kind of symbolic relationship here between law and theory. A theory becomes more and more respected and powerful the more phenomena that can be derived from it, and the law describing these phenomena becomes more meaningful and useful if it can be made part of a theory. Thus, Newton’s theory of universal gravitation gained greatly in stature because it enabled one to derive the laws that govern the moon’s motion, known by empirical rules since the days of the Babylonian observers. (p. 8)

Within computer science, for instance, the programmer or software developer goes through the process of designing, creating, testing, and debugging a software or system application. This is how a program becomes made. However, the question of why a program does good or bad is commonly expressed with the notion that truth is a matter of pleasure; that is supposed as a fine replacement for the objective balance. For reference, the United States of America, which produces litigation, confirms that scientifically analytical laws follow propositions. Bo Brinkman and Alton F. Sanders distributed information about the classical popularizer of pleasure as truth, John Stuart Mill. Brinkman and Sanders (2013) claimed, “Laws governing free speech in the United States today are generally consistent with Mill’s view. However, the issue of free speech is not settled” (p. 245). For computer science solutions, optimizing code might not always be the simplest or most effective way for building a successful product, but documentation can guide that process. Therefore, the reader may look to an objective source of ethical documentation about people for an understanding of why a particular software is good or bad.

Among scholars, theology is considered the queen of the sciences; it is a responsibility and a gift. The Book of James (KJV) says, “My brethren, have not the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with respect of persons” (2:1). This is a prohibition on favoritism for an ethic of fairness for the Jew and the Gentile. Thomas Aquinas theological first way of proving a Creator supports this. Ellen T. Charry wrote that Aquinas (2000) explained,

For it is only when acted upon by the first cause that the intermediate causes will produce the change: if the hand does not move the stick, the stick will not move anything else. Hence one is bound to arrive at some first cause of change not itself being changed by anything, and this is what everybody understands by God. (p. 32)

Thomas Aquinas perceived that the initial state is the origin of the continuum. With a final point, Archimedes would call this a summation. Regardless of the origin, considering the final point as the end of history, Hegel (1956) argued that “The History of the world is none other than the progress of the consciousness of freedom” (p. 19). The Bible challenges that by conserving a story throughout history. The Almighty, spoken on behalf of by the prophet Isaiah (KJV), said, “And who, as I, shall call, and shall declare it, and set it in order for me, since I appointed the ancient people? And the things that are coming, and shall come, let them shew unto them” (Is 44:7). The progress that Hegel mentioned leaves behind truths perceived as irrational for the evolution of validity. Thus, when documenting computer applications, agreement with Hegel would require abandoning whatever causes errors in usefulness according to rationality. However, mainstream physicists who discuss quantum mechanics usually agree that human reason is not always sufficient for understanding the world. The Nazis, for example, were rational in that they had a goal in mind that they thought would be useful to them: creating a master race by destroying the Jews. Therefore, when Arons mentioned that law may be derived from theory, this is in agreement with the mathematical sciences, but it did not embed the assumptions into human perception; empirical observations were considered a stepping stone towards the highest understanding. Therefore, documentation should be valued for what it can help beyond the code. Further, analytically oriented computer scientists should be raised up by reflecting on the big picture when developing applications because doing so provides more contextual understanding.

In the coming weeks, I will work on more courses related to computer science and information systems. That said, there are alternative worldviews in this pluralistic nation that I live among as an American. While that is the case, I do think that I should stay focused on what is straight ahead that is reckoned for me. There may be chronological parameters that allow for people meeting in the middle. Seeking true exegesis for studying the perceptions of others is what I think is the way. Thus, I hope that my comments provide such opportunities over time.

References

Brinkman, W. J., & Sanders, A. F. (2013). Ethics in a Computing Culture. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Charry, E. T., & Aquinas, T. (2000). Inquiring after God by Means of Scientific Study. In Inquiring after God: Classic and Contemporary readings (p. 32). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Hegel, G. W. (1956). The Philosophy of History.

Pickover, C. A. (2015). The Physics Devotional: Celebrating the Wisdom and Beauty of Physics.

Retaining Humanity in the Information Age

In recent times, situations with humans and machine computers increased. For evidence, there is a recent analysis by a doctor of philosophy student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), Carrie Cai, and supported by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professors Rob Miller and Jim Glass, former CSAIL postdoc Philip Guo, and undergraduate Anji Ren. Adam Conner-Simons in CSAIL expressed the results of Cai’s leadership related to a language-learning app labeled with the name WaitChatter. Conner-Simons (2015) said, “In a pilot study, WaitChatter users learned an average of about four words a day over a period of two weeks. The system takes words from both a built-in list as well as the user’s ongoing chat conversations.” The presence of interconnectivity is apparent, but learning in and of itself as a purpose did not save even the wisest Ancient Grecians from travailing. For instance, the reader may look to the writings of Plato about Socrates and reckon the irritation that he felt at being the target of sophistry despite his effort of love for his people (Cahn, Markie, 2012 p. 16-32).

Within these times, Byron Spice shared information about the results of Facebook and Carnegie Mellon University researchers, Moira Burke and Robert Kraut, on personal interactions with computers. Spice (2016) said, “By considering mood and behavior over time, Burke and Kraut’s study revealed that Facebook interactions with friends predicted improvements in such measures of well-being as satisfaction with life, happiness, loneliness and depression.” The psychological importance of understanding what and who people love is consistently important for humanity. Othello’s moral failings because of not understanding Iago’s hatred towards him serves as a sign and a wonder of the opposite being true as well, forever (Shakespeare).

For people, what we do is not as important as why we do it. Marshall McLuhan spoke about media serving as extensions of the human body. McLuhan (1989) said, “Without the artist’s intervention man merely adapts to his technologies and become their servo-mechanism” (p. 98). Therefore, people engineering their environments might become re-engineered for the new environments; the man without creativity will be controlled by circumstances. The Book of Proverbs (KJV) states, “My son, fear thou the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change” (24:21). People may integrate faith with reason or develop derivative works of human-to-human or human-to-world relationships in the form of human-computer interactions, and prayerfully the truths that apply to all people will be retained. For learning languages as part of daily labor, the labor should be retained as done by Cai’s team. When seeking the transcendent with love from people, dependence on emotion more than logic or credibility is a timeless warning sign about misplacing trust in the hearts of men given to change more than the wisdom of those who study and reflect on relevance beyond the self. Further, the human self without a consistent truth about him will be repurposed for someone else’s design. Therefore, when interacting with computers designed by humanity, the reader should take care that he retains what results in blessings for ourselves and other people; that the soul of man is enriched.

References

Cahn, S. M., & Markie, P. J. (2012). Ethics: History, theory, and contemporary issues (5th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. p. 16-32

Conner-Simons, A. (2015, May 14). Learn a language while you text | MIT News. Retrieved from http://news.mit.edu/2015/learn-language-while-you-text-0514

Shakespeare, W., & Barnet, S. (1996). Othello.

Spice, B. (2016, September 6). Friends Help Friends on Facebook Feel Better | Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science. Retrieved from https://www.scs.cmu.edu/news/friends-help-friends-facebook-feel-better

Data Privacy and Protections

For the ongoing discussion of data theory and applications, Science News, an organization that reports research of various subjects, released an article called Theoretical computer science provides answers to data privacy problem. For the purpose of this article, concepts related to the handling of data are discussed, and their applications. Specifically, the purposes that relate data to people are recognizable. Science News (2015) said, “Some data may be trivial, but in many cases, data are deeply personal. They can even influence our insurance premiums or the price we pay for a product online.” An example of a working system model with privacy worked with was reported by Science News as researched by a professor of computer science in Harvard University and former director of the Center of Research on Computation and Society, Salil Vadhan (2015). Described as “differential privacy” (2015), this concept protects data with approximations. With this premise, a series of queries may provide an identifiable pattern; a summation may be reckoned. The calculus of this approximation would then be equivalent to an integral that will produce an exact result. Science News reported that this is defended against by good judgment that would be increasing randomization and taking full care in comparing characteristics across queries (2015). This assessment seems vague because what people view as good judgment depends on initial assumptions about reality.

Although rule utilitarianism, for example, is discussed in contemporary times as a serious ethical concept, there is debate about its efficacy. Bo Brinkman and Alton F. Sanders describe rule utilitarianism. Brinkman and Sanders (2013) said, “In rule utilitarianism, we select a set of rules, and each act is evaluated as to whether it conforms to them” (p. 16). In this case, a rule utilitarian approach might be that the supposedly good judgment of differential privacy is people who may have access will have the keys to accurate information retrieval, and people with incorrect keys will get incorrect values returned to them. In the late 20th century AD, Winslett, et al. (1994) supposed a similar proposal. Winslett et al. (1994) said, “We believe that many of the MLS problems can be resolved by directly addressing the question of what an MLS database means, rather than making syntactic adjustments to avoid semantic problems” (p. 627). This proposal essentially asserted that lying is an effective form of confidentiality for cyber security. Although the supposed truth of relative semantics makes sense for the access key holders for secret information in short term, this causes a failure of integrity. For a historical account, the Apostle Paul discussed the Hebrew Bible. Paul (KJV) said, “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one:” (Rom 3:10). This was the view before grace.

As Joachim Biskup showed, lying is not the correct approach. Biskup (2000) said, “The initial belief and the first k-1 answers (lies) would reveal the last secret psi_k.” This is a mathematical statement that reflects a Biblical prophecy. The Son of Man (KJV) said, “Therefore whatsoever ye have spoken in darkness shall be heard in the light; and that which ye have spoken in the ear in closets shall be proclaimed upon the housetops” (Lu 12:3). Therefore, when randomizing data for the purpose of producing lies or untrue information for those who seek unauthorized access to data, I think that more secure concepts require something other than this sort of concept because true information will eventually be revealed, though that may be understood as defense in depth with protections being more understood as unapproachable like the image that a security guard for a crucial represents to attackers, defenders, and other vulnerable groups. Similarly, an available mathematical problem that computers would have difficulty solving would serve as a known defense that would be well defensible in contemporary times.

References

Biskup, J. (2000). For unknown secrecies refusal is better than lying. Data & Knowledge Engineering, 33(1), 1-23. doi:10.1016/S0169-023X(99)00043-9

Brinkman, W. J., & Sanders, A. F. (2013). Ethics in a Computing Culture. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Marianne Winslett, Kenneth Smith, and Xiaolei Qian. 1994. Formal query languages for secure relational databases. ACM Trans. Database Syst. 19, 4 (December 1994), 626-662. DOI=http://0-dx.doi.org.library.regent.edu/10.1145/195664.195675

National Science Foundation. (2015, October 7). Theoretical computer science provides answers to data privacy problem: New tools allow researchers to share and study sensitive data safely by applying ‘differential privacy’. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 25, 2016 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151007144933.htm