Reflections on the First Spring 2017 Session

Within the previous eight weeks, two courses were completed: Computer Architecture and Introduction to Information Systems. Since my first session involved two courses, CSCI 210 and ISYS 204 that were three credit courses within the Regent University course offerings, the format was accelerated; as the previous and future courses fitting the description mentioned are identified as such, they require more percentages of weekly study time periods in shorter total course durations. ISYS 204 being an introductory course consisted of learning business and analytical knowledge about information systems, and Biblical ethics remain significant since this was a Regent University course, a Christian university. As sister to Oxford University, Regent University emphasizes the integration of the faith described and urged by the Bible with reason related to contemporary issues; ISYS 204 involving this demand on students was consistent with previous courses in my academic program.

In ISYS 204, there was an emphasis on the economics related to businesses using information systems as well; since contemporary economic theory in secular settings approves of utilitarianism, accepting this emphasis within course textbook titled Essentials of Management Information Systems by Laudon and Laudon (2017) as a challenge for the liberal arts encouraged confidence. The writing attributed by critical scholars to the Apostle Luke, the Book of Acts in the King James Bible expresses the basis that the Apostle Paul had for confidence. The Book of Acts (KJV) says about Paul, “And Paul dwelt two whole years in his own hired house, and received all that came in unto him. Preaching the kingdom of God, and teaching those things which concern the Lord Jesus Christ, with all confidence, no man forbidding him” (28:30-31). An interpretation of this passage is the recognition that any coming unto followers of Christ and not bringing the truth should be denied entry into our place of rest and encouragement for the rate of action that faith in the God of Israel provides (2 John 10:10). In exposition, the Laudon and Laudon (2017) text discusses the Golden Rule of the Biblical Scriptures; that a candidate ethical principle for business practices involves doing unto others as you would have them do unto you (p.127). Theologically speaking, although Laudon and Laudon are not literally in my home when studying the course text, the thoughts written to the text can be challenged; the form of written communication on the Internet Web provides a domain for capturing thoughts so that they are for Christ (2 Cor 10:5) rather than every wind of doctrine (Eph 4:14).

In my view as a Regent University student, the applications of the Biblical Scriptures mentioned was a learning outcome of CSCI 210 and ISYS 204, though not explicitly mentioned as such in them. My basis for the applications of the Bible for CSCI 210 and ISYS 204 is my experience with CSCI 220, Ethics for Computer Science: supporting the divine command theory was encouraged by my course instructor while rejected by the writers of the course texts called Ethics in a Computing Culture, Bo Brinkman and Alton F. Sanders (2013, p. 10). In contrast, the relevant Stallings (2016) text for CSCI 210, Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance, did not suggest or recommend any ethical arguments for computer architecture, so the Biblical integration related to that text was more relatable to transcendentals in mathematics than approval of utilitarianism by contemporary economists; conflicting interpretations of ethics were researched outside the CSCI 210 by Stallings for reasonable exposition. Having said that, there were much descriptions about computer architecture and low-level programming helped with programming skills; instructions on binary, hexadecimal, and assembly language programming emphasized allowed for studying applications related to computer architecture. Describable as essentially a game, one in particular, Core Wars, involved programs that combat a separate program for processing capability was useful for study; this was not played, so to speak, as the concept of play is about action without reason.

With two courses in the Spring 2017 term concluded, there are seven courses that remain in my academic program. Looking forward to my future challenges, my view remains that Regent University has much that may be offered to students, and online courses require commitment to significant periods of self-study that might build confidence in a power beyond the intelligence of mankind. Hopefully, my future academic studies will involve more Biblical integration for scientific and scientifically analytical theories and applications for continued research opportunities and the blessings of family and friendships.

References

Brinkman, B., & Sanders, A. F. (2013). Ethics in a Computing Culture. Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Laudon, K. C., & Laudon, J. P. (2017). Essentials of Management Information Systems (12th ed.). Pearson Education.

Stallings, W., Zeno, P., & Jesshope, C. (2016). Computer Organization and Architecture: Designing for Performance (10th ed.). Hoboken, NJ.

 

 

Reflections on 2016

Over the course of 2016, I learned about various topics related to natural and transcendent aspects of existence, and I think that reflecting on them is important for understanding why I should continue on my academic journey. Since January, I received admission to Regent University, and I call myself a Regent: someone who represents a ruler before He returns. This ruler is who I believe will be called “Faithful and True” (KJV, Revelation 19:11). Starting from that belief, understanding all truths related to the Biblical Scriptures and therefore all man might be achieved. This is only in the context of man’s understanding, for the Father said that man’s ways are not his ways (Is 55:8). For example, microeconomics might be commonly thought of as a “dry science,” but it comes alive when noticed in the Biblical Scriptures. Information Systems contextually affect every part of contemporary society, and the ethical relevance related to those who would guide or control people with them might result in efficient results if the epistemological structures that the faiths of the people conceptualizing and engineering the science and its applications are built on are understood.

Besides that, computer science has theories, but without a constant standard, values may progress while many vulnerable groups who I think are marginalized people remain those who will not have the opportunity because the best in us would not be represented over time. Next, theories about data relate to information. The Bible says that “Word of the Most High pierces even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit” (He 4:12). For the lives of people, I think that strengthening hermeneutical understanding for exegetical results is the best way that data may be utilized. Although there is the notion that pleasure should be maximized as an evolution of lasting happiness, the most widely respected nation-state in contemporary history holds, among other truths believed self-evident, that the pursuit of happiness is granted to all men by our Creator (US 1776). People may argue the details, but I agree with the contemporary view that teleological theology helps understand the context of data more than derivations to a point alone may seem. Hence, integrating faith with reason builds general relatability to what is important: the transcendent standard of morality and people who may work with His concept of right and wrong even if without a direct relationship with the Son of Man.

While ethical understanding has relevance to isolated groups, there is strength in greater numbers that morality may persuade. When volunteering for a video game website, for example, I realized that the niche ethical code of conduct that people accepted for membership was a bubble that reflected reality in an exponential form, so subjects quickly gained and lost relevance, but the moral principles related to it are inversely conserved over time with a slow rate of change in understanding. I think that experience is a sign that knowledge is and will increase, but wisdom remains an outcome of looking outside ourselves for guidance and reflection. Furthermore, mathematical understanding comes at the cost of time and effort, but the reward is a refined theological understanding of the sovereign who created the world and is blessed from everlasting to everlasting (Gen 1:1, Ps 41:13).

In Parallel and Distributive Programming, the superiority of relatively larger datasets being handled by a distributed set of nodes in comparison to the superiority of handling relatively smaller datasets faster with shared memory is relevant for understanding the logic of people seeking moral and ethical understanding of the world and what is beyond it. This is because the Tower of Babel, for instance, was built with a people speaking one language, a relatively smaller dataset than what languages exist, today, and they might have reached heaven had it not been for the Most High’s intervention (Gen 11:1-9). In contrast, people are reaching towards the heavens in a distributed way over the course of thousands of years with man eventually stepping foot on the moon itself with common ambitions in popular culture and in government-funded programs beyond the earth’s orbit.

With these courses, I do think that the most important aspect of my education is ethical understanding related to how scientific theory and application might benefit the common man in a way better than pleasure can provide that would be recognized as victory. In the light that right beliefs shine in the world, the engineering applications of the world may benefit all of us who accept the responsibility that understanding what truth, goodness, and beauty are require in us. Biblically-based education provides the opportunity for that.

Purpose-Driven Human-Computer Interaction

Within the years past of the second millennium AD, there is a discussion about the predicted future of human-computer interaction in dialogues related to computing technology. In a fictional science fiction video game concentrating on cybernetic augmentations in society, Deus Ex: Human Revolution (Eidos Montreal, 2011), an article is given called Nano-Augmentation – Pipedream, or Theory for the Future. The fictional article in the game asserts:

In the decade to come, the enhanced beings — post humans who are our progeny– will look at the mechanical devices we rudely bolted on to our living flesh or buried inside our grey matter, and they will mock us for our crudity. They will look upon what we have made with the same curiosity, the same disinterest, as the pilot of the veetol helicopter would look upon an ox-cart. (2011)

The premise of this story is not an aberration of the world, but rather a checkpoint on the path towards human-computer interconnectivity. Ray Bradbury wrote about the slights people would perceive in an environment essentially saturated in computing technologies that surveil society. Bradbury (1953) wrote that the self-described murderer of technology said, “I’m the vanguard of the small public which is tired of the noise and being taken advantage of and pushed around and yelled at, every moment music, every moment in touch with some voice somewhere” (p. 299).  In contemporary times, the field of engineering solution discussed by a wide domain of computer science including cyber security is called The Internet of Things. A writer for the Journal of Engineering (2014) said, “Slowly shaping the market in embedded security or the testing and auditing of IoT applications prior to launch are the first steps in providing a trustworthy base: Arrayent, Hewlett-Packard, Microchip, NXP Semiconductors, Sonatype, and Wind River.” Therefore, major participants for the future of human-computer interaction consider this field relevant enough that it is invested in for the purpose of embedding computing systems into human lives, but forward presentations do not discuss the strength of the flank that ushers in the legality of human-computer interaction. Although the truth of innovation being followed by litigation may be thought of as an avoidable practice, the relevance of confronting the exponential growth of technology with the notion that the rest of its users is part of the human psyche.

Statista, an organization that provides scholarly communities with facts and statistics explained the origin of the Internet of Things (IoT). Statista stated, “In 1999, British technologist Kevin Ashton came up with the term Internet of Things (IoT) to define a network that not only connects people, but also the objects around them” (Web 1). What Kevin Ashton labeled, Ray Bradbury expressed as something that would result in slights harming people attributable to societal misconceptions about the benefits of relying on normalized science and technology without inner sanity and outward care for results that benefit the common man. The question that follows naturally depends on the historical and Biblical truth (KJV) that “That every idle word that men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment” (Mat 12:36). Therefore, the reader might ask what benefit is scientific understanding and technological connectivity if it does not result in the advancement of humanity in a moral sense. The notion that the Deus Ex: Human Revolution presents related to curiosity and mockery as a result of progress is a focus of this because the strength of character does not necessarily evolve, so to speak, with, what in this case may be sarcastically called, character displacement of technological adaptation. Having said that, value may be found by accepting that the big picture of scientific advancement and technological innovation is justified through correct faith applied for the common man, male and female. This is so that he may be offered a hand up and understand that the machinery that augments the person extending it will be a beautiful instance of equipping him with the mental tools for giving him an active voice in society.

References

ABI research; internet of things is cybersecurity’s next frontier, according to ABI research. (2014). Journal of Engineering, 718.

Bradbury, R. (1953). The Murderer.

Nano-Augmentation – Pipedream, or Theory for the Future [Deus Ex: Human Revolution]. Montreal, Canada: Eidos Montreal.

Web 1. Statista. (n.d.). Internet of Things – Statistics & Facts. Retrieved December 21, 2016.