Reflections on Recursion

In the Spring 2017 term, approximately one week remains until completion. Throughout studies, this semester, I learned computer architecture, management information systems, and data structures & algorithms; and software engineering; and networks & telecommunications concepts. These courses being mandatory for my academic program are among the final courses for my Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree. After this semester, one term remains until August graduation. In that term, my final courses in my undergraduate program shall be mobile & smart computing, discrete mathematics, network security, and linear algebra. All of the aforementioned statements may be considered as recursive (Goodrich, Tamassia, and Goldwasser, p. 190).

In some cases, undergraduate programs are limited by total years since the program started while other in periods of semesters attended, and alternatives are limited by total credits allowed for the program. In any of these cases, requirements for completion encourage initiative from students as well as faculty. The Apostle Paul shared insights about the incentives of studying by approaching various topics with a single framework. The Apostle Paul (KJV) said, “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (2 Tim 3:16-17).  If selected courses start soon to a semester start or session, or books are purchased similarly, then the threat of missing deadlines increases from the early engagement opportunity inverting. The growing threats might be, as I noticed, due to variations in recognition of relevant collaborative for collective goals. This might be a sort of circular logic in that there is an absence of perceived importance for deadlines because there is more time remaining, there is more time remaining because of extensions permitted, and the extensions permitted result in less relevance for deadlines. In contrast, James Rachels’ (2012) explained that cultural relativists would invite acceptance of the following: “The Greeks believed it was wrong to eat the dead, whereas the Callatians believed it was right to eat the dead. Therefore, eating the dead is neither objectively right nor objectively wrong. It is merely a matter of opinion, which varies from culture to culture” (p. 749).

Considering the cultural relativist argument, the invitation from the ‘Greeks and Callatians’ syllogism is implicit casting about the dead and the living, claiming that there is life after death in the physical world. A possible interpretation of the cultural, generations of men, women, and children may learn about the merits and faults of arguments with the comfort that there is the proverbial more that is expected. The sort of invitation to an impasse by implicit casting is essentially saying that societies may be recognized for eventually and irreducibly immutable components. Kenta Oono and Yuichi Yoshida (2016) describing a property being proportional to an irreducible character is one kind of generalization of linearity testing. Therefore, looking at study schedules in terms of irreducible start times and finish times for an academic course or program as white box testing might trend towards an unfinished academic program. Examples of this may be recognized as an additional day for every assignment missed passed a deadline, another semester for every course not passed, or an academic program not completed.  However, actively engaging in coursework day-by-day strengthens awareness of information. In agreement with Aristolean virtue, consistent study and action builds character over time thus understanding emerges. Even in the case of an unfinished program, considering it in terms of time that is complete and reviewing fewer and fewer times until prepared for another program attempt could ready the student for a more purposeful or explicit attempt at the program. Therefore, sometimes, focusing on the details of a program can be more effective than a topical overview for evaluating measures for success.

References

Cahn, S. M., & Markie, P. J. (2012). Ethics: History, theory, and contemporary issues (5th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford university press.

Goodrich, Michael T.; Tamassia, Roberto; Goldwasser, Michael H.. Data Structures and Algorithms in Java, 6th Edition (Page 190). Wiley. Kindle Edition.

Oono, K., & Yoshida, Y. (2016). Testing properties of functions on finite groups. Random Structures & Algorithms, 49(3), 579-598. doi:10.1002/rsa.20639

 

Faith, Honor, and Tradition

Samuel, a Hebrew Israelite, expressed a lesson in ancient times about faith. The first book of Samuel (KJV) says, “And Samuel said, Hath the LORD as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the LORD? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams” (15:22). A possible interpretation of this is that a chosen people acknowledging the right purpose requires accepting that ritual is not the purpose, but rather the practice. This can be applied to those granted privileges from being selected for membership to a group based on academic merit, leadership potential, community service, and likelihood for future career success. With such criteria each being a basis for inclusion to a group, an honor society might be deduced. In contemporary times, when man works towards a goal, sometimes recognition is sought for career or personal advancements. In my experience, focusing on the stylishness and how fashionable an activity essentially has risks that provide opportunity for aesthetic beauty and refinement of a personal pathos. Further, a styled pathos with ethics and logic can show the merits of an activity. However, there are also threats from respecting the customized style of man or the traditions of man more than building traditions based on faith that is beyond the finite. Therefore, I think that honor is earned, but faith is gained through study. When considering the variety of faiths that people in the United States have as a pluralistic civilization, sometimes honoring how something feels like a good thing can help in building networks. Even so, building networks for future stability might require doing something even if there are perceptions that contradict those goals. The common saying “go with your gut” is similar in context and applications; relying on the physical world for actions comes with risks. The same may be said with having faith in the supernatural. That said, the supernatural proposing more than what man may consider, alone, is a structure for getting things done beyond an isolated part of history. Therefore, honor rather built in a teleological sense might extend the benefits of an ethic to morally significant events.

For example, consider doing business with a hotel manager, who for the purpose of this discussion, will be renamed Alice R. The reader may seek a hotel room for a future event, but there is an error in the process of booking it. When seeking a resolution to this, the reader could call and express a disregard for the feelings of Alice and the reputation of the hotel that she represents. However, there might be a notion of honor in the context of horizontal honor while the reader may work for another company or study with an alternative faith. However, in this situation, the request from the reader is treated with disrespect by Alice for possible reasons such as not studying the importance of respecting others, or perhaps forgetting about it. Therefore, Alice does a disservice to herself by caring more about vain works than building a relationship with a paying client that might extend to future business opportunities. As a result, the reader would be disrespected in the short term, but there are substitutes for businesses with activities that aggregate to trending company policies in Alice’s industry. Therefore, a substitute for tradition is right thinking. In exposition, business trends building up those who conserve what is respectable is probably more sustainable than how organizational leadership would progress. By focusing on political motivations at the cost of customer loyalty, company advancements are probably reduced.

Coordinate Systems: Inputs and Outputs

With the various coordinate systems involved in mathematical deduction such as Cartesian, Polar, Cylindrical, and Spherical, the correctness of system application depends on the applicability of human work utilizing any or all of them for morally good results. For example, when building a house, a Psalm begins with the truth that says, “Except the LORD build the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain” (Ps 127:1). Therefore, Rene Descartes’ famous statement may be analyzed. Descartes said: “cogito ergo sum: I think therefore I am” (Web 1). In saying this, the inventor of the Cartesian coordinate system was asserting that his mind gives him substance. I believe that more accurate is mihi virtutem Dei ergo sum: God gives me strength therefore I am. This is supported by the Biblical Scriptures. The anonymous writer (KJV) of the Book of Hebrews wrote, “For every house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God” (3:4). The first act that the Most High did, creation, was viewed by Him as good (Ge 1:31). In following His eternally supreme standard, I think that choosing a coordinate system is therefore supported by a truly good purpose for utilizing it. Examples are Cartesian for building a contemporary rectangular home for the homeless (Pro 21:13), Cylindrical for a ship required for national defense and protecting marginalized groups (Ex 22:21-23), and Spherical for determining the shortest distance between two points on the ocean with longitude known so that demanded food suppliers perform their obligations in their appointed time (Ecc 3:1-8).

References

Web 1. (2006). cogito ergo sum. In Livingstone, E.(Ed.), The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church: Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2 Dec. 2016, from http://0-www.oxfordreference.com.library.regent.edu/view/10.1093/acref/9780198614425.001.0001/acref-9780198614425-e-1295.